Foreground: The 1974 is a model 1303 that is powered by a 1600cc engine and can be identified by its curved windscreen and large dashboard. This model is significant because it was the first generation to receive Macpherson strut front suspension while previous generations used torsion beams. 
Right: The 1978 model here is 1200cc that remains similar to past models but with front indicators and rear tail lights that are similar to the model 1303. 
Aft: The 1995 is a taxi that was produced in Brazil under license right up to 2002 and was the longest running production line ever.
Foreground: The 1974 is a model 1303 that is powered by a 1600cc engine and can be identified by its curved windscreen and large dashboard. This model is significant because it was the first generation to receive Macpherson strut front suspension while previous generations used torsion beams. 
Right: The 1978 model here is 1200cc that remains similar to past models but with front indicators and rear tail lights that are similar to the model 1303. 
Aft: The 1995 is a taxi that was produced in Brazil under license right up to 2002 and was the longest running production line ever.
The AutoMuseum curator giving the Singapore journalists a private tour of the incredible Beetle collection.
Featured  here is a 1100cc 36bhp engine fitted on what appears to be a 1955 variant. Given away by the enlarged oval shaped taillights. Taillights did not include turn signals as cars then used semophores situated on the "B" pillar for sedans, on rear quarter panel on cabrios. Tail light lenses at this point were still made of glass.
The ‘1200’ models were reserved for the European market while the rest of the world received the ‘1300’ models.
The 1978 model shown here was probably built in Germany but production was mostly shifted to Mexico in 1979. This would lead us to suspect that the 1981 model was also made in Mexico but with the same original tooling.
More examples of Beetles made in the Mexico plant.
Quirky fan creations. Made entirely out of basket weave, the car is entirely drivable as only the body has been replaced with the basket weave. While the other, a wooden sculpture is only a static display.
A crazy tuned example of a Beetle by European tuner Oettinger, this 1973 Beetle is the widest ever made. At 2220mm with massive wheel arches that hide racing tires. The car hides a Porsche 911 Carrera RS 2.7 powerplant in the back producing 255bhp.
Oettinger hopped up this Beetle with plenty of Porsche parts including all round disc brakes that could haul the car back to sanity when it takes off with its incredible power to weight ratio. To deal with the added horsepower, the entire chassis (no. 1303) was heavily modified and reinforced. The car could reach in excess of 210kmh. Much more than the original Beetle could at the time.
Herbie was probably the movie that shot the humble Beetle to international stardom. Shown here is one of the stunt cars that were used in the movie. This example here seems to be made up of a number parts from different eras which might due to the fact that stunt cars were hastily rebuilt from scrap parts between filming.
Evidence of this Beetle’s past stunt car status.
Another example of a Mexican built Beetle.
Another example of an Oettinger tuned Beetle, this one here was fitted with Porsche Fuchs wheels that adds to the performance look.
Made entirely out of stamps, this 1983 example was donated by fans.
The 1946 Kommandeurwagen was built from a collection of leftover parts from the bombed out factory after WW2. Using raised chassis and suspension similar to the Kubelwagens and Schwimmwagens for rough terrain after the war. During the war, this variant was named Kommandeurwagen as it was favoured by troop commanders as a mode of transport.
The Schwimmwagen was the only amphibious vehicle on the German front. Rear propeller had to be engaged by swinging it downward to make gear contact with the engine. Steering was done using the front wheels.
The 1944 Kubelwagen. Most used form of transport by the German land troops in most of Europe and Africa. A similar model was released in 1969 as the Type 131 aka "The Thing". Type 131 is not very common but strangely, you can rent them in Bali today for cheap!
Made exclusively to be a taxi by the Mexican plant, the 1953 Beetle had a longer wheelbase and rear suicide doors that aided ingress and egress of fares. One such beetle was used to bring John Wayne to the Oscars, as part of his rebellion and mockery against the glitz and glamour of Hollywood.
A trio of Beetle Cabriolets. While a number of Beetles have been seen with a two tone colour scheme, it was never a factory option.
A very pristine example of a 1955 Beetle dressed up as a rally car but doesn’t carry any evidence of  an actual rally career.
Volkswagen Museum Beetle Collection
During our trip to Wolfsburg , we got a chance to get up close to one of the most comprehensive collection of Beetles in existence anywhere in the world. Benjamin takes us on a pictorial journey through the different generations of this modern pop icon. 
Story and Photos by Benjamin G. Kline direct from Wolfsburg, Germany - posted 13 Dec 2013
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