Ferrari FF 6.3 Review: Fast Four-ward

Ferrari FF 6.3 Review: Fast Four-ward

OneShift Editorial Team
OneShift Editorial Team
27 Jan 2012
What we like:
pros
Stupendous straight line speed
pros
epic V12 motor
pros
agile handling
pros
clever AWD system
pros
useable rear seats
pros
luxurious cabin
pros
the noise it makes
pros
relatively comfortable ride
pros
lightning fast gearbox
pros
looks and feels a million dollars
What we dislike:
cons
Costs you an arm and a leg
cons
styling divides opinions

The California showed that Ferrari could execute interiors that are worthy of their cars’ million dollar price tags. It’s the same with the FF – from the plethora of buttons to the leather lined surfaces, the cabin just feels exquisite and expensive.

Up front, the driver is greeted by the 458-style instrument panel, which consists of a large rev counter flanked by TFT screens on either side. The screens display speedometer readings, parameters for the different manettino modes as well as images from the reversing camera and so on. Just like in the 458, the FF doesn’t feature any steering column mounted stalks for the indicators and wipers. The indicators and wipers are instead activated via buttons on the steering wheel. This is hardly intuitive for someone who doesn’t drive a Ferrari on a regular basis but it’ll surely be second nature to those who drive one often enough. An option fitted to the car pictured here is the carbon fibre rim and shift lights on the wheel. The electrically adjustable front seats are made from magnesium - they not only look fantastic but also offer brilliant comfort and support as well.

Behind the front occupants, the FF features two full sized seats that are somewhat generously sized for such a high end and sporty GT model. The two rear seats are separated by a large hump in the middle but leg and headroom in the rear is reasonable enough for passengers not to feel claustrophobic in even on longer drives, making the rear seats more useable than say, the Aston Martin Virage’s. Ferrari’s claims that the FF is a genuine four-seater is certainly not unfounded.

The shooting brake body style equates to a luggage area that is spacious and useable. According to Ferrari, the FF’s boot offers 450 litres with the rear seat backs up, which makes the load area even more voluminous than some family hatchbacks. Fold down the rear seat backs and the trunk volume increases to 800 litres, which makes the rear compartment extremely versatile and perhaps perfect for bringing out the family dog to experience some speed.

The FF’s unconventional approach to its latest 2+2 GT will divide opinion like no other recent Ferrari – you will either love the way it looks or loathe it. Take a drive in it though and you’ll realise that the FF will perform and drive like a genuine V12 Prancing Horse.

The FF is conceived to be a practical and versatile Ferrari that can be used in unfavourable weather and surfaces, objectives that can be met by much more affordable luxury SUV models like the Range Rover or Porsche Cayenne. But there is no other car out there, let alone a big off roader that stirs the soul and emotions like a Ferrari can, thus making the evocative FF not only a one of a kind Ferrari but also a one of a kind car in this crowded automotive world.

Credits: Story and photos by Raymond Lai

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