Infiniti FX 5.0 Review: Putting the Sport in SUV

Infiniti FX 5.0 Review: Putting the Sport in SUV

OneShift Editorial Team
OneShift Editorial Team
08 Feb 2012
What we like:
pros
Distinctive styling
pros
sheer road presence
pros
it’s a big V8
pros
superbly equipped
pros
capable on road handling
pros
superb gearbox
pros
competitive pricing
pros
accurate steering
What we dislike:
cons
Thirsty
cons
plenty of Nissan switchgear inside
cons
materials used in cabin could be better
cons
slightly jiggly ride

It is on the inside of the FX where Infiniti’s links with Nissan are most obvious. The dashboard and centre console are littered with Nissan switches and controls. The large LCD screen adds a premium feel but the layout of the buttons and knob to control the menus are similar to the Nissan Teana and Murano’s. Despite the generously sized touch screen, there’s no factory fitted sat nav system on the FX50.

The dashboard’s exposed surfaces also feel more Japanese hard rather than premium soft. The soft, factory-wrapped leather upholstery on the seats though fare better on the perceived luxury front. The electrically adjustable and ventilated front chairs are big and comfortable but they could do with a tad more under thigh support. The driving position is high and commanding but the wide A-pillars can be a hinderance to the driver’s front three-quarter view.

The FX’s FM platform and long bonnet means that the interior isn’t as roomy as one might think. Admittedly, it’s not very spcious in here but rear passengers will hardly have any complaints about any lack of head and legroom. Moreover, the rear seatbacks can be adjusted for recline for the most comfortable seating posture. The well-shaped boot offers a flat and vast load area that Infiniti says can gobble up to four golf bags.

Safety levels are high for a Japanese model. The Euro NCAP five-star rated FX50 comes equipped with six airbags, ISOFIX child seat anchor points as well as active safety kit like VDC Vehicle Dynamics Control, tyre pressure monitoring system, Forward Collission Warning and Lane Departure Warning and Prevention. Lane Departure Prevention is an interesting electronic aid that is activated via a button on the steering wheel – When the system detects that the vehicle has unknowingly or unintentionally deviated out of its lane, it takes action by using the VDC to gently apply the brakes on the inside wheels to assist the driver in returning the vehicle back into its lane.

The range topping FX50 is suitably equipped with all manner of luxuries and conveniece features that its German rivals can only be green with envy about. These standard kit include keyless operation, bi-Xenon headlamps, 21-inch alloy wheels, adaptive cruise control, powered tailgate, 11-speaker Bose stereo, ventilated seats, two-zone climate control, Bluetooth handsfree phone and audio streaming, powered seats and steering column and so on.

At $350k, the V8-powered FX50 is competitively priced against six-cylinder variants of its most obvious German competitors, Slightly disappointing interior aside, the dramatically styled FX50 is every bit as acomplished as its more established rivals with a touch of Japanese dependibility thrown in for good measure.

Credits: Story and photos by Raymond Lai

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