9 Worst Carparks in Singapore

9 Worst Carparks in Singapore

OneShift Editorial Team
OneShift Editorial Team
21 Jun 2015

Think no carpark is too narrow, or no lot too small? These 10 horrible mall carparks in Singapore will put your driving skills to the challenge, and possibly have you screaming at your dashboard after you donate some paint samples to a carpark ramp.

1. Fortune Centre

This mall is aptly named, because parking here will cost you a fortune; two fortunes if you’re not careful. This is one of those carparks that requires you to drive up almost five floors before you even get to the parking spaces themselves. Kudos to whoever designed this; everyone loves driving up and down narrow winding slopes for no good reason.

2. Bugis Junction

Most cars should actually get by fine here, but not if you have lowered suspension. If you do, spare your car’s undercarriage from the multitude of bumps and ramps and just take the train.

3. Orchard Building

You’d expect a mall carpark with rates higher than that of Ion Orchard to at least be half decent. Spoiler alert: it’s not. Sharp angles and ramps galore describes the layout of this carpark. You might expect to leave with a couple of scratches.

4. Changi Airport T2

Not really a mall, but still a horrible carpark. Ever wondered what it would feel like to be flushed down a toilet? Try driving down this carpark’s endless spiral. Once, when I was a kid sitting in my dad’s car, I almost threw up from all the spiraling. I’m not even kidding.

5. Parkway Parade

“Carpark” is a generous word for this sloping, labyrinthian nightmare. “Carmaze” would be more suitable. This carmaze is chock full of narrow turns, and even more terrible drivers who don’t know how to handle those turns properly and considerately. Your skills may not even be put to the test so much as your patience.

6. Shaw Towers

On the plus side, Shaw Towers offers relatively cheap parking. Unfortunately, you get what you pay for, with exits that look like they were built for go karts. If you don’t want your car getting scratched on the walls of this carpark as you attempt to squeeze through the narrowest narrow exits, steer very clear.

7. Funan the IT Mall

Thank goodness it isn’t called “Funan the Engineering Mall”, because this carpark is a disaster, with narrow slopes between levels, and metal poles placed such that you’d be forgiven for thinking that they’re designed to be hit by cars.

8. Marine Parade Central Multi-Storey Carpark (Blk 89)

The design of this carpark is so outdated it deserves to be relegated into the oblivion of the past alongside relics like the dinosaurs and video cassettes. Unlike most modern carparks, this old dump of a carpark has its entrance and exit located side by side to each other, with a one-way, spiraling flow of traffic.

This means that drivers leaving a parking lot and drivers just coming in need to merge into the same lane, and drivers exiting via a down slope need to intersect with drivers trying to ascend an up slope. This is a perfect recipe for gridlock, and an hour wasted being stuck in a carpark traffic jam. Unless you have too much time on your hands and love being in traffic jams, go park somewhere else.

9. Liang Court

I like to leave the best for last - or the worst, that is. Remember all the negatives of the previous carparks I’ve listed? Tight turns, narrow lanes, long slope spirals – this carpark has them all, and to a worse extent than most. The contest between this carpark and Marine Parade Multi-Storey carpark for worst carpark in Singapore is a close one for me, but this isn’t really a contest you’d want to win.

Do you have any nominations for the one and only Worst Mall Carpark in Singapore? Leave a comment!

Credits: Ivan How

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